Expression and characterization of recombinant humanized anti-HER2 single-chain antibody in Pichia pastoris for targeted cancer therapy

Xiaodan Cao, Haijun Yu, Chao Chen, Jia Wei, Ping Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The availability of self-targeting and low immunogenic therapeutic agents is critical to efficient cancer therapy. Therefore, the development of humanized therapeutic antibodies is particularly appealing. Results: A humanized single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that can target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-overexpressing cancer cells was designed and produced via expression in Pichia pastoris. The expression gave a high yield of 8 mg protein/l (with a purity of 92 %) using shake-flask cultures. Functional studies also revealed that the purified recombinant anti-HER2 scFv exhibited anti-proliferative activity and could bind efficiently to HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Conclusion: The recombinant scFv offers promising therapeutic and binding efficiencies that are desirable for targeted cancer therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1347-1354
Number of pages8
JournalBiotechnology Letters
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 5 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation Grant (2013M540341), Key grant cultivating interdisciplinary studies of Chinese Education Ministry (WF1113014), National Natural Science Foundation of China (21303050 and 31471659), and Pujiang Talent Program of Shanghai Municipality (13PJD012).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

Keywords

  • Anti-HER2
  • Breast cancer cell line SKBR3
  • Cancer therapy
  • Heterogeneous expression
  • Humanized single-chain variable fragment
  • Pichia pastoris

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