Exploring the impact of self-construal and cultural intelligence on alcohol consumption: Implications for social marketing

Denni Arli, Andre Pekerti, Krzysztof Kubacki, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is enormous cross-cultural variation in alcohol choices and drinking behaviour. Because of the inherent differences in historical drinking culture, as well as differences in alcohol policy globally, similarities and differences in drinking patterns have long been a focus of interest among public health and social marketing researchers. Thus, the purposes of this study are (1) to explore differences between groups (Australian and non-Australian-born respondents) on self-construal, cultural intelligence and alcohol consumption and (2) to investigate the impact of self-construal and cultural intelligence on alcohol consumption in Australia. Data for this study were collected through a large public university in Australia (N=669). The paper found that people with interdependent self-concept were less likely to drink alcohol than people with independent self-concept and cultural intelligence was not significantly related to hazardous alcohol use, harmful alcohol use and dependence symptoms. Variations between Australian-born and overseas-born groups were evident. Limitations of the current study and an agenda for future research are outlined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-285
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

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