Exploring neutrino–nucleus interactions in the GeV regime using MINERvA

(The MINERν A Collaboration)

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the advance of particle accelerator and detector technologies, the neutrino physics landscape is rapidly expanding. As neutrino oscillation experiments enter the intensity and precision frontiers, neutrino–nucleus interaction measurements are providing crucial input. MINERvA is an experiment at Fermilab dedicated to the study of neutrino–nucleus interactions in the regime of incident neutrino energies from one to few GeV. The experiment recorded neutrino and antineutrino scattering data with the NuMI beamline from 2009 to 2019 using the Low-Energy and Medium-Energy beams that peak at 3GeV and 6GeV, respectively. This article reviews the broad spectrum of interesting nuclear and particle physics that MINERvA investigations have illuminated. The newfound, detailed knowledge of neutrino interactions with nuclear targets thereby obtained is proving essential to continued progress in the neutrino physics sector.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4243-4257
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Physical Journal: Special Topics
Volume230
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This document was prepared by members of the MINERvA Collaboration using the resources of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, HEP User Facility. Fermilab is managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC (FRA), acting under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359. These resources included support for the MINERvA construction project, and support for construction also was granted by the United States National Science Foundation under Award No. PHY-0619727 and by the University of Rochester. Support for participating scientists was provided by NSF and DOE (USA); by CAPES and CNPq (Brazil); by CoNaCyT (Mexico); by Proyecto Basal FB 0821, CONICYT PIA ACT1413, and Fondecyt 3170845 and 11130133 (Chile); by CONCYTEC (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica), DGI-PUCP (Dirección de Gestión de la Investigación - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru), and VRI-UNI (Vice-Rectorate for Research of National University of Engineering) (Peru); NCN Opus Grant No. 2016/21/B/ST2/01092 (Poland); by Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK); by EU Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action; by a Cottrell Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement; by an Imperial College London President’s PhD Scholarship. We thank the MINOS Collaboration for use of its near detector data. Finally, we thank the staff of Fermilab for support of the beam line, the detector, and computing infrastructure.

Funding Information:
This document was prepared by members of the MINERvA Collaboration using the resources of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, HEP User Facility. Fermilab is managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC (FRA), acting under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359. These resources included support for the MINERvA construction project, and support for construction also was granted by the United States National Science Foundation under Award No. PHY-0619727 and by the University of Rochester. Support for participating scientists was provided by NSF and DOE (USA); by CAPES and CNPq (Brazil); by CoNaCyT (Mexico); by Proyecto Basal FB 0821, CONICYT PIA ACT1413, and Fondecyt 3170845 and 11130133 (Chile); by CONCYTEC (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica), DGI-PUCP (Dirección de Gestión de la Investigación - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru), and VRI-UNI (Vice-Rectorate for Research of National University of Engineering) (Peru); NCN Opus Grant No. 2016/21/B/ST2/01092 (Poland); by Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK); by EU Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action; by a Cottrell Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement; by an Imperial College London President’s PhD Scholarship. We thank the MINOS Collaboration for use of its near detector data. Finally, we thank the staff of Fermilab for support of the beam line, the detector, and computing infrastructure. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring neutrino–nucleus interactions in the GeV regime using MINERvA'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this