Exploiting free silicon for energy-efficient computing directly in NAND flash-based solid-state storage systems

Peng Li, Kevin Gomez, David J. Lilja

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Energy consumption is a fundamental issue in today's data centers as data continue growing dramatically. How to process these data in an energy-efficient way becomes more and more important. Prior work had proposed several methods to build an energy-efficient system. The basic idea is to attack the memory wall issue (i.e., the performance gap between CPUs and main memory) by moving computing closer to the data. However, these methods have not been widely adopted due to high cost and limited performance improvements. In this paper, we propose the storage processing unit (SPU) which adds computing power into NAND flash memories at standard solid-state drive (SSD) cost. By pre-processing the data using the SPU, the data that needs to be transferred to host CPUs for further processing are significantly reduced. Simulation results show that the SPU-based system can result in at least 100 times lower energy per operation than a conventional system for data-intensive applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference, HPEC 2013
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
ISBN (Print)9781479913657
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event2013 IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference, HPEC 2013 - Waltham, MA, United States
Duration: Sep 10 2013Sep 12 2013

Publication series

Name2013 IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference, HPEC 2013

Other

Other2013 IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference, HPEC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityWaltham, MA
Period9/10/139/12/13

Keywords

  • NAND Flash
  • OpenCL
  • Parallel computing
  • SSD

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