Explanation of the unusual temperature dependence of the atmospherically important OH + H2S → H2O + HS reaction and prediction of the rate constant at combustion temperatures

Benjamin A. Ellingson, Donald G Truhlar

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35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rate constants for the OH + H2S → H2O + HS reaction, which is important for both atmospheric chemistry and combustion, are calculated by direct dynamics with the M06-2X density functional using the MG3S basis set. Energetics are compared to high-level MCG3/3//MC-QCISD/3 wave function theory and to results obtained by other density functionals. We employ canonical variational transition-state theory with multidimensional tunneling contributions and scaled generalized normal-mode frequencies evaluated in redundant curvilinear coordinates with anharmonicity included in the torsion. The transition state has a quantum mechanically distinguishable, nonsuperimposable mirror image that corresponds to a separate classical reaction path; the effect of the multiple paths is examined through use of a symmetry number and by torsional methods. Calculations with the reference-potential Pitzer-Gwinn treatment of the torsional mode agree with experiment, within experimental scatter, and predict a striking temperature dependence of the activation energy, increasing from -0.1 kcal/mol at 200 K to 0.2, 1.0, 3.4, and 9.8 kcal/mol at 300, 500, 1000, and 2400 K. The unusual temperature dependence arises from a dynamical bottleneck at an energy below reactants, following an addition complex on the reaction path with a classical binding energy of 4.4 kcal/mol. As a way to check the mechanism, kinetic isotope effects of the OH + D2S and OD + D2S reactions have been predicted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12765-12771
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume129
Issue number42
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 24 2007

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