Experimental reproduction of poult enteritis syndrome: Clinical findings, growth response, and microbiology

N. Jindal, D. P. Patnayak, A. F. Ziegler, A. Lago, S. M. Goyal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Poult enteritis syndrome (PES) is an infectious disease of turkey poults characterized by diarrhea, dullness, and depression. Five experiments were conducted to reproduce the disease in turkey poults using intestinal contents of PES-affected birds. In all experiments, poults at 14 d of age were divided into 4 groups and were orally given 2 mL of unfiltered supernatant, filtered supernatant, sediment dissolved in PBS, or PBS alone. Inocula in experiments 1, 3, and 5 consisted of intestinal contents from PES-affected birds of less than 2 wk of age, whereas those in experiments 2 and 4 consisted of intestinal contents from PES-affected birds of 4 to 6 wk of age. Poults in all groups were observed daily for clinical signs. The BW and microbiological criteria in experiments 1, 3, and 5 were evaluated at 5, 10, and 15 d postinoculation, whereas in experiments 2 and 4, these observations were made at 10 and 20 d postinoculation. Rotavirus, astrovirus, and Salmonella were present in all 5 inocula. Diarrhea and depression were the major signs in poults given PES material. Significant retardation of growth was observed in poults given any of the 3 PES materials, but this effect was more pronounced in poults given the sediment inoculum. Rotavirus, astrovirus, and Salmonella were detected in poults given PES material. In some cases, enterovirus was also detected. No major difference was noticed in experimental reproduction of PES when intestinal contents from different age birds were used as the inoculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-958
Number of pages10
JournalPoultry science
Volume88
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded in part by a grant from the Rapid Agricultural Response Fund, University of Minnesota.

Keywords

  • Astrovirus
  • Poult enteritis syndrome
  • Rotavirus
  • Salmonella

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