Experiences of United States genetic counseling supervisors regarding race/ethnicity in supervision: A qualitative investigation

Cheyenne Dewey, Patricia McCarthy Veach, Bonnie S LeRoy, Krista Redlinger-Grosse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While addressing culture in supervision is important, research suggests genetic counseling supervisors are unsure how to discuss it within the supervisory relationship. This study explored the perceptions of genetic counselor supervisors from the United States regarding how their supervisors approached racial/ethnic differences in their supervisory relationships when they were students, effects on those relationships, and subsequent influences on their supervision practices. Nine genetic counselors who self-identified as White/Caucasian, and nine who self-identified as racial/ethnic backgrounds other than White/Caucasian, were purposively recruited to participate in semi-structured phone interviews. Questions explored participant perceptions of how their supervisors approached racial/ethnic differences in supervision, effects on those supervisory relationships, and influences of their experiences as students on their current supervision practice. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes, with most participants agreeing that (1) recognition of race/ethnicity in supervision was limited as a student and in their current supervision practices; (2) supervisors vary in their comfort discussing race/ethnicity; (3) prior student supervision experiences of racial/ethnic differences have limited effects on current supervision practice; and (4) supervisors desire more training in how to approach conversations around race/ethnicity. Further professional discussions about the role of race/ethnicity in the supervisory relationship and training in addressing the cultural context in supervision are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 National Society of Genetic Counselors

Keywords

  • cultural competence
  • culture
  • education
  • race/ethnicity
  • supervision

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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