Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado

Aline C. Soterroni, Fernando M. Ramos, Aline Mosnier, Joseph Fargione, Pedro R. Andrade, Leandro Baumgarten, Johannes Pirker, Michael Obersteiner, Florian Kraxner, Gilberto Câmara, Alexandre X.Y. Carvalho, Stephen Polasky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The Cerrado biome in Brazil is a tropical savanna and an important global biodiversity hot spot. Today, only a fraction of its original area remains undisturbed, and this habitat is at risk of conversion to agriculture, especially to soybeans. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of expanding the Soy Moratorium (SoyM) from the Brazilian Amazon to the Cerrado biome. The SoyM expansion to the Cerrado would prevent the direct conversion of 3.6 million ha of native vegetation to soybeans by 2050. Nationally, this would require a reduction in soybean area of approximately 2%. Relative risk of future native vegetation conversion for soybeans would be driven by the Brazilian domestic market, China, and the European Union. We conclude that, to preserve the Cerrado’s biodiversity and ecosystem services, urgent action is required, including a zero native vegetation conversion agreement such as the SoyM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbereaav7336
JournalScience Advances
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 17 2019

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soybeans
vegetation
biological diversity
European Union
habitats
agriculture
ecosystems
Brazil
quantitative analysis
China
expansion

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Soterroni, A. C., Ramos, F. M., Mosnier, A., Fargione, J., Andrade, P. R., Baumgarten, L., ... Polasky, S. (2019). Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado. Science Advances, 5(7), [eaav7336]. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aav7336

Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado. / Soterroni, Aline C.; Ramos, Fernando M.; Mosnier, Aline; Fargione, Joseph; Andrade, Pedro R.; Baumgarten, Leandro; Pirker, Johannes; Obersteiner, Michael; Kraxner, Florian; Câmara, Gilberto; Carvalho, Alexandre X.Y.; Polasky, Stephen.

In: Science Advances, Vol. 5, No. 7, eaav7336, 17.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soterroni, AC, Ramos, FM, Mosnier, A, Fargione, J, Andrade, PR, Baumgarten, L, Pirker, J, Obersteiner, M, Kraxner, F, Câmara, G, Carvalho, AXY & Polasky, S 2019, 'Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado', Science Advances, vol. 5, no. 7, eaav7336. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aav7336
Soterroni AC, Ramos FM, Mosnier A, Fargione J, Andrade PR, Baumgarten L et al. Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado. Science Advances. 2019 Jul 17;5(7). eaav7336. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aav7336
Soterroni, Aline C. ; Ramos, Fernando M. ; Mosnier, Aline ; Fargione, Joseph ; Andrade, Pedro R. ; Baumgarten, Leandro ; Pirker, Johannes ; Obersteiner, Michael ; Kraxner, Florian ; Câmara, Gilberto ; Carvalho, Alexandre X.Y. ; Polasky, Stephen. / Expanding the soy moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado. In: Science Advances. 2019 ; Vol. 5, No. 7.
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