Exosomes and tunneling nanotube conduits: Synergistic interaction that facilitates intercellular communication between malignant and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment

Emil Lou, William Sperduto, Subbaya Subramanian

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles-including exosomes-facilitate long-range intercellular communication in cancer. These membrane-lined vesicles are diffusible carriers of vital cellular signals that can alter the phenotype of recipient cells. However, they are not the only mediator of long-range intercellular cross talk in the complex and heterogeneous tumor microenvironment. Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) and tumor microtubes are long, thin, filamentous actin-based cell extensions formed by cancer cells to create direct pipeline-like connections that also mediate direct intercellular signaling. Exosomes and TNTs can, in fact, act synergistically: tumor-derived exosomes stimulate the formation of TNTs in cancer, and in turn TNTs can serve as direct physical conduits for cell-to-cell transport of exosomes and their contents. Here, we will examine the interface of exosomes and TNTs; discuss how they work together rather than in isolation; review physiologic conditions that enhance their formation; and explore common mechanisms and markers of formation that serve as potential therapeutic targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDiagnostic and Therapeutic Applications of Exosomes in Cancer
PublisherElsevier
Pages219-234
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780128127742
ISBN (Print)9780128128046
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Cancer biology
  • Cell communication
  • Exosomes
  • Extracellular vesicles
  • Intercellular communication
  • Metastasis
  • Microtubules
  • Microvesicles
  • Tumor microtubes
  • Tumor-treating fields
  • Tunneling nanotubes

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