Executive functioning predicts discrepancies between objective and self-reported physical activity in older adults: a pilot study

John P.K. Bernstein, Madeline D.W. Noland, Katherine E. Dorociak, Mira I. Leese, Samuel Y. Lee, Adriana Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Physical activity (PA) has been linked to cognitive functioning and mental health in older adulthood. Multiple subjective (i.e., self-report) and objective measures (e.g., pedometer) have been used to assess PA, however their agreement varies across studies. This pilot study examined cognitive predictors of the agreement between subjective and objectively measured PA. A total of 30 community-dwelling older adults completed a neuropsychological battery, as well as a measure of subjective PA and wore a wristwatch-based pedometer for 30 days to assess objective PA. Greater discrepancy between subjective and objective PA was correlated with poorer executive functioning (r = −.44, p = .02), and this remained true in regression models after controlling for age and education (b = .-54, p = .01). Older adults with lower executive functioning may be more likely to inaccurately report time spent engaging in PA. Future studies should explore whether this relationship holds in larger samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 23 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by funding from the National Institutes of Health (R01AG058687) and the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (CX001669-01).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Aging
  • cognition
  • executive function
  • physical activity
  • technology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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