Examining the relationship between motor assessments and handwriting consistency in children with and without probable Developmental Coordination Disorder

Jin Bo, Alison Colbert, Chi Mei Lee, Jeffrey Schaffert, Kaitlin Oswald, Rebecca Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) often experience difficulties in handwriting. The current study examined the relationships between three motor assessments and the spatial and temporal consistency of handwriting. Twelve children with probable DCD and 29 children from 7 to 12 years who were typically developing wrote the lowercase letters "e" and "l" in cursive and printed forms repetitively on a digitizing tablet. Three behavioral assessments, including the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI), the Minnesota Handwriting Assessment (MHA) and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC), were administered. Children with probable DCD had low scores on the VMI, MABC and MHA and showed high temporal, not spatial, variability in the letter-writing task. Their MABC scores related to temporal consistency in all handwriting conditions, and the Legibility scores in their MHA correlated with temporal consistency in cursive "e" and printed "l". It appears that children with probable DCD have prominent difficulties on the temporal aspect of handwriting. While the MHA is a good product-oriented assessment for measuring handwriting deficits, the MABC shows promise as a good assessment for capturing the temporal process of handwriting in children with DCD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2035-2043
Number of pages9
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume35
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • DCD
  • Handwriting
  • MABC
  • MHA
  • VMI

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