Examining pedestrian satisfaction in gated and open communities: An integration of gradient boosting decision trees and impact-asymmetry analysis

Wei Dong, Jason Cao, Xinyi Wu, Yu Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compares satisfaction with walkability of residents in gated and open communities in Harbin, China. The results of gradient boosting decision trees show that neighborhood attributes associated with satisfaction with walkability differ between gated and open communities. Neighborhood leisure activities, space, and street furniture are the most influential attributes for walkability in gated communities. Sidewalk quality, neighborhood safety, and leisure activities are important for open communities. Using impact-asymmetry analysis, this study illustrates the nonlinear effects of neighborhood attributes on pedestrian satisfaction and classifies these attributes into frustrators, dissatisfiers, hybrids, satisfiers and delighters. By integrating attribute classification and their performance, we found that social interaction is an improvement priority for gated communities and that neighborhood space and street furniture could be enhanced given resource availability. For open communities, we recommend that planners improve outdoor facilities, canopy and shelter, and open space.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-257
Number of pages12
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • Decision tree
  • Importance performance analysis
  • Neighborhood design
  • Satisfaction
  • Walkability

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