Examining characteristics associated with quitting smoking during pregnancy and relapse postpartum

Farnaaz Kia, Nicole Tosun, Samantha Carlson, Sharon S Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction Smoking during pregnancy is a significant public health concern that can cause adverse health outcomes for both the mother and fetus. Studies have shown only 40% of women quit smoking during pregnancy, with more than half relapsing within 6 months, and up to 90% relapsing within one year. This study investigates differences in demographics and smoking-related symptomatology between pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters, as well as factors associated with postpartum relapse. Methods Data on pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters were obtained from two separate parent studies. Data on smoking demographics and smoking-related symptomatology were collected at screening visits. Results Compared to pregnant smokers, pregnant quitters had more favorable smoking characteristics (e.g., smoked fewer cigarettes per day, reported higher motivation for abstinence and less dependency). They also had more favorable relationship characteristics (e.g., were more likely to be married, less likely to have a significant other who smokes) and had less reproductive liability (e.g., fewer pregnancies, fewer children). In terms of symptomatology, pregnant quitters reported more positive affect, negative affect, physical symptoms and withdrawal but less craving. Predictors of postpartum relapse included increased maternal age, having a significant other who smokes and an increased likelihood of returning to smoking after pregnancy (self-reported prior to delivery). Conclusions Several demographics and smoking-related symptomatology were significantly different between pregnant quitters and pregnant smokers. In addition, multiple factors predicting postpartum relapse were identified. This information can inform personalized interventions for high risk pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters at risk for postpartum relapse.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages114-119
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Smoke
Postpartum Period
Smoking
Recurrence
Pregnancy
Public health
Tobacco Products
Screening
Health
Demography
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Maternal Age
Motivation
Fetus
Public Health
Mothers

Keywords

  • Cessation
  • Pregnancy
  • Relapse prevention
  • Smoking

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Examining characteristics associated with quitting smoking during pregnancy and relapse postpartum. / Kia, Farnaaz; Tosun, Nicole; Carlson, Samantha; Allen, Sharon S.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 78, 01.03.2018, p. 114-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Introduction Smoking during pregnancy is a significant public health concern that can cause adverse health outcomes for both the mother and fetus. Studies have shown only 40% of women quit smoking during pregnancy, with more than half relapsing within 6 months, and up to 90% relapsing within one year. This study investigates differences in demographics and smoking-related symptomatology between pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters, as well as factors associated with postpartum relapse. Methods Data on pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters were obtained from two separate parent studies. Data on smoking demographics and smoking-related symptomatology were collected at screening visits. Results Compared to pregnant smokers, pregnant quitters had more favorable smoking characteristics (e.g., smoked fewer cigarettes per day, reported higher motivation for abstinence and less dependency). They also had more favorable relationship characteristics (e.g., were more likely to be married, less likely to have a significant other who smokes) and had less reproductive liability (e.g., fewer pregnancies, fewer children). In terms of symptomatology, pregnant quitters reported more positive affect, negative affect, physical symptoms and withdrawal but less craving. Predictors of postpartum relapse included increased maternal age, having a significant other who smokes and an increased likelihood of returning to smoking after pregnancy (self-reported prior to delivery). Conclusions Several demographics and smoking-related symptomatology were significantly different between pregnant quitters and pregnant smokers. In addition, multiple factors predicting postpartum relapse were identified. This information can inform personalized interventions for high risk pregnant smokers and pregnant quitters at risk for postpartum relapse.

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