Evidence of Pent-Up Demand for Care After Medicaid Expansion

Angela R. Fertig, Caroline S. Carlin, Scott Ode, Sharon K. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared new Medicaid enrollees with similar ongoing enrollees for evidence of pent-up demand using claims data following Minnesota’s 2014 Medicaid expansion. We hypothesized that if new enrollees had pent-up demand, utilization would decline over time as testing and disease management plans are put in place. Consistent with pent-up demand among new enrollees, the probability of an office visit, a new patient office visit, and an emergency department visit declines over time for new enrollees relative to ongoing Medicaid enrollees. The pattern of utilization suggests that the newly insured are connecting with primary care after the 2014 Medicaid expansion and, unlike ongoing Medicaid enrollees; the newly insured have a declining reliance on the emergency department over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)516-524
Number of pages9
JournalMedical Care Research and Review
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Medicaid
Office Visits
Hospital Emergency Service
Disease Management
Primary Health Care

Keywords

  • Medicaid
  • health care utilization
  • health reform
  • pent-up demand

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

Evidence of Pent-Up Demand for Care After Medicaid Expansion. / Fertig, Angela R.; Carlin, Caroline S.; Ode, Scott; Long, Sharon K.

In: Medical Care Research and Review, Vol. 75, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 516-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fertig, Angela R. ; Carlin, Caroline S. ; Ode, Scott ; Long, Sharon K. / Evidence of Pent-Up Demand for Care After Medicaid Expansion. In: Medical Care Research and Review. 2018 ; Vol. 75, No. 4. pp. 516-524.
@article{a375c3543766449dac23b14f2ab723f7,
title = "Evidence of Pent-Up Demand for Care After Medicaid Expansion",
abstract = "We compared new Medicaid enrollees with similar ongoing enrollees for evidence of pent-up demand using claims data following Minnesota’s 2014 Medicaid expansion. We hypothesized that if new enrollees had pent-up demand, utilization would decline over time as testing and disease management plans are put in place. Consistent with pent-up demand among new enrollees, the probability of an office visit, a new patient office visit, and an emergency department visit declines over time for new enrollees relative to ongoing Medicaid enrollees. The pattern of utilization suggests that the newly insured are connecting with primary care after the 2014 Medicaid expansion and, unlike ongoing Medicaid enrollees; the newly insured have a declining reliance on the emergency department over time.",
keywords = "Medicaid, health care utilization, health reform, pent-up demand",
author = "Fertig, {Angela R.} and Carlin, {Caroline S.} and Scott Ode and Long, {Sharon K.}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1077558717697014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "516--524",
journal = "Medical Care Research and Review",
issn = "1077-5587",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evidence of Pent-Up Demand for Care After Medicaid Expansion

AU - Fertig, Angela R.

AU - Carlin, Caroline S.

AU - Ode, Scott

AU - Long, Sharon K.

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - We compared new Medicaid enrollees with similar ongoing enrollees for evidence of pent-up demand using claims data following Minnesota’s 2014 Medicaid expansion. We hypothesized that if new enrollees had pent-up demand, utilization would decline over time as testing and disease management plans are put in place. Consistent with pent-up demand among new enrollees, the probability of an office visit, a new patient office visit, and an emergency department visit declines over time for new enrollees relative to ongoing Medicaid enrollees. The pattern of utilization suggests that the newly insured are connecting with primary care after the 2014 Medicaid expansion and, unlike ongoing Medicaid enrollees; the newly insured have a declining reliance on the emergency department over time.

AB - We compared new Medicaid enrollees with similar ongoing enrollees for evidence of pent-up demand using claims data following Minnesota’s 2014 Medicaid expansion. We hypothesized that if new enrollees had pent-up demand, utilization would decline over time as testing and disease management plans are put in place. Consistent with pent-up demand among new enrollees, the probability of an office visit, a new patient office visit, and an emergency department visit declines over time for new enrollees relative to ongoing Medicaid enrollees. The pattern of utilization suggests that the newly insured are connecting with primary care after the 2014 Medicaid expansion and, unlike ongoing Medicaid enrollees; the newly insured have a declining reliance on the emergency department over time.

KW - Medicaid

KW - health care utilization

KW - health reform

KW - pent-up demand

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042235877&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042235877&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1077558717697014

DO - 10.1177/1077558717697014

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 516

EP - 524

JO - Medical Care Research and Review

JF - Medical Care Research and Review

SN - 1077-5587

IS - 4

ER -