Evidence for the existence of a lateral cervical nucleus in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits

Glenn J. Giesler, Lisa R. Miller, Anne M. Madsen, James T. Katter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The lateral cervical nucleus of carnivores is large and is thought to play a prominent role in somatosensory processing. In contrast, early studies indicated that rats, mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits did not have a lateral cervical nucleus. However, we reported the existence of a lateral cervical nucleus in rats as a result of studies using retrograde transport techniques. In the present study, similar techniques were used to examine the possibility that early studies also overlooked the lateral cervical nucleus in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits. In each of these species, a retrograde tracer was injected into the thalamus. These injections labeled a small number of neurons contralaterally in the dorsal part of the lateral funiculi of rostral cervical segments. Mice had the greatest number of neurons projecting from the lateral cervical nucleus to the thalamus, and rabbits had the fewest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume263
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1987

Keywords

  • retrograde labeling
  • spinocervicothalamic pathway
  • spinothalamic tract

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