Evidence for coordinated functional activity within the extended amygdala of non-human and human primates

Jonathan A. Oler, Rasmus M. Birn, Rémi Patriat, Andrew S. Fox, Steven E. Shelton, Cory A. Burghy, Diane E. Stodola, Marilyn J. Essex, Richard J. Davidson, Ned H. Kalin

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Abstract

Neuroanatomists posit that the central nucleus of the amygdala (Ce) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) comprise two major nodes of a macrostructural forebrain entity termed the extended amygdala. The extended amygdala is thought to play a critical role in adaptive motivational behavior and is implicated in the pathophysiology of maladaptive fear and anxiety. Resting functional connectivity of the Ce was examined in 107 young anesthetized rhesus monkeys and 105 young humans using standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods to assess temporal correlations across the brain. The data expand the neuroanatomical concept of the extended amygdala by finding, in both species, highly significant functional coupling between the Ce and the BST. These results support the use of in vivo functional imaging methods in nonhuman and human primates to probe the functional anatomy of major brain networks such as the extended amygdala.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1059-1066
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroImage
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 16 2012

Keywords

  • Bed nucleus of the stria terminalis
  • Central nucleus
  • Connectivity
  • Human
  • Resting-state fMRI
  • Rhesus macaque

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    Oler, J. A., Birn, R. M., Patriat, R., Fox, A. S., Shelton, S. E., Burghy, C. A., Stodola, D. E., Essex, M. J., Davidson, R. J., & Kalin, N. H. (2012). Evidence for coordinated functional activity within the extended amygdala of non-human and human primates. NeuroImage, 61(4), 1059-1066. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.045