Evidence-based policies on school nutrition and physical education: Associations with state-level collaboration, obesity, and socio-economic indicators

Jennifer E. Pelletier, Melissa N. Laska, Richard MacLehose, Toben F. Nelson, Marilyn S. Nanney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite calls for more cross-sector collaboration on obesity prevention, little is known about the role of collaborative partnerships, or groups of organizations from different sectors working together toward a shared goal, in state policy activities. This study examined associations between competitive food/beverage and physical education policies and state-level collaboration and state characteristics (obesity, socioeconomic indicators, public health funding levels) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, USA, in 2012. We examined cross-sectional associations between evidence-based competitive food/beverage and physical education policies from the Classification of Laws Associated with School Students and state characteristics from the School Health Policies and Practices Study and other national data sources using prevalence ratios and generalized linear models. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Cross-sector collaboration (i.e., state staff reports of working together on school nutrition or physical education activities) between state-level nutrition and physical education staff and ten types of organizations was not significantly associated with having state policies. Childhood obesity (RR = 1.78, 95% CI[1.11,2.85]), high-school non-completion (RR = 2.35, 95% CI[1.36,4.06]), poverty (RR = 1.89, 95% CI[1.16,3.09]) and proportion non-white or Hispanic residents (RR = 1.75, 95% CI[1.07, 2.85]) were positively associated with the presence of elementary school competitive food/beverage policies. Fewer indicators were associated with policies for middle and high schools. The large investment of time and resources required for cross-sector collaboration demands greater research evidence on how to structure and manage collaborative partnerships for the greatest impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-93
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume99
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Physical Education and Training
Food and Beverages
Obesity
Economics
Organizations
Nutrition Policy
School Health Services
Pediatric Obesity
Information Storage and Retrieval
Poverty
Health Policy
Hispanic Americans
Linear Models
Public Health
Exercise
Students
Research

Keywords

  • Community networks
  • Nutrition policy
  • Physical education
  • Policy
  • Schools

Cite this

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title = "Evidence-based policies on school nutrition and physical education: Associations with state-level collaboration, obesity, and socio-economic indicators",
abstract = "Despite calls for more cross-sector collaboration on obesity prevention, little is known about the role of collaborative partnerships, or groups of organizations from different sectors working together toward a shared goal, in state policy activities. This study examined associations between competitive food/beverage and physical education policies and state-level collaboration and state characteristics (obesity, socioeconomic indicators, public health funding levels) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, USA, in 2012. We examined cross-sectional associations between evidence-based competitive food/beverage and physical education policies from the Classification of Laws Associated with School Students and state characteristics from the School Health Policies and Practices Study and other national data sources using prevalence ratios and generalized linear models. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Cross-sector collaboration (i.e., state staff reports of working together on school nutrition or physical education activities) between state-level nutrition and physical education staff and ten types of organizations was not significantly associated with having state policies. Childhood obesity (RR = 1.78, 95{\%} CI[1.11,2.85]), high-school non-completion (RR = 2.35, 95{\%} CI[1.36,4.06]), poverty (RR = 1.89, 95{\%} CI[1.16,3.09]) and proportion non-white or Hispanic residents (RR = 1.75, 95{\%} CI[1.07, 2.85]) were positively associated with the presence of elementary school competitive food/beverage policies. Fewer indicators were associated with policies for middle and high schools. The large investment of time and resources required for cross-sector collaboration demands greater research evidence on how to structure and manage collaborative partnerships for the greatest impact.",
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AU - Nanney, Marilyn S.

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