Evaluation of urinary and serum metabolites in Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea) with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

Kristine R. Petrini, Jody P. Lulich, Laurie Treschel, Ray F. Nachreiner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Baseline renal function data was collected during 24-hr periods of feeding and fasting from three male and three female adult Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea) with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine was analyzed for calcium, phosphorus, and oxalate, and urinalyses were performed. There was no evidence of glucosuria, which has been previously reported in Asian small-clawed otters with urolithiasis. Urinary oxalate levels were quite high when compared with those of dogs and humans without uroliths, and the ratio of urinary oxalate to calcium was close to 1:1 during periods of food consumption. There was no significant difference in urinary oxalate excretion between the fed and fasting states. Urinary calcium excretion was five times greater during feeding than during fasting. Calcium levels were higher in the otters than those reported for dogs without uroliths but were similar to those for normal humans. Water consumption and urine production were significantly higher during periods of food consumption. Serum chemistry analyses and electrolyte levels were also determined. There was no evidence of hypercalcemia. Fractional clearance of calcium and phosphorus and endogenous creatinine clearance were significantly higher during food consumption than during fasting. Parathyroid hormone levels were similar to those reported for dogs and cats. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was slightly lower in the otters than in dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-63
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume30
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 1999

Keywords

  • Aonyx cinerea
  • Calcium
  • Otter
  • Oxalate
  • Urine
  • Urolith

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