Evaluation of tissue oxygen saturation in naturally occurring canine shock patients

Alexia N. Berg, Michael G. Conzemius, Richard B. Evans, Kelly M. Tart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (StO 2 ) in a population of dogs with naturally occurring shock and to evaluate the relationship of StO 2 with an established veterinary severity scoring system (Acute Patient Physiologic and Laboratory Evaluation) and patient survival. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: University teaching hospital. Animals: Twenty-five adult dogs presenting in shock, as determined by the presence of hypotension, the calculated shock index, and hyperlactatemia. Interventions: StO 2 was measured prior to any therapeutic interventions. Blood samples were also collected for measurement of plasma lactate, complete blood count, and a serum biochemical profile. Abdominal and thoracic focused assessment with sonography was also performed. Measurements and Main Results: Dogs enrolled in this study had lower mean (±SD) StO 2 values (65.12 ± 17.7%) than previously reported in experimental models of canine hemorrhagic shock. There was a moderate correlation between lower StO 2 and increasing Acute Patient Physiologic and Laboratory Evaluation scores. A single StO 2 value, assessed prior to therapeutic intervention, was not a sensitive predictor of mortality in this population. Conclusions: Dogs with naturally occurring shock have lower mean StO 2 values than those previously reported in dogs with experimentally induced shock. A lower initial StO 2 was associated with worse disease severity but was not a significant predictor of survival in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-153
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Keywords

  • dogs
  • hypovolemia
  • illness severity
  • oxygenation indices

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