Evaluation of canine hepatic masses by use of triphasic computed tomography and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave doppler ultrasonography and correlation with histopathologic classification

Erin R. Griebie, Frederic H. David, Christopher P. Ober, Daniel A. Feeney, Kari L. Anderson, Arno Wuenschmann, Carl R. Jessen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine clinical relevance for quantitative and qualitative features of canine hepatic masses evaluated by use of triphasic CT and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography and to compare diagnostic accuracy of these modalities for predicting mass type on the basis of histopathologic classification. ANIMALS 44 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs with histopathologic confirmation (needle core, punch, or excisional biopsy) of a hepatic mass were enrolled. Triphasic CT and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography of each hepatic mass were performed. Seventy quantitative and qualitative variables of each hepatic mass were recorded by 5 separate observers and statistically evaluated with discriminant and stepwise analyses. Significant variables were entered in equation-based predictions for the histopathologic diagnosis. RESULTS An equation that included the lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass and the highest venous-phase mass conspicuity was used to correctly classify 43 of 46 (93.5%) hepatic masses as benign or malignant. An equation that included only the lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass could be used to correctly classify 42 of 46 (91.3%) masses (with expectation of malignancy if this value was < 37 Hounsfield units). For ultrasonography, categorization of the masses with cavitations as malignant achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 80.4%. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Triphasic CT had a higher accuracy than ultrasonography for use in predicting hepatic lesion classification. The lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass was a simple calculation that required 2 measurements and aided in the differentiation of benign versus malignant hepatic masses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1273-1283
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume78
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

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