Evaluation of a mixed meal test for diagnosis and characterization of pancrEaTogEniC diabetes secondary to pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis: Rationale and methodology for the DETECT study from the consortium for the study of chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer

Phil A. Hart, Dana K. Andersen, Kieren J. Mather, Alicia C. Castonguay, Mandeep Bajaj, Melena D. Bellin, David Bradley, Noemy Contreras, Aida Habtezion, Murray Korc, Yogish Kudva, Maxim S. Petrov, David C. Whitcomb, Dhiraj Yadav, Ying Yuan, Jo Ann S. Rinaudo, Sudhir Srivastava, Jose Serrano, Mark O. Goodarzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus is most commonly the result of chronic pancreatitis but can also occur secondary to pancreatic cancer. The early identification of pancreatogenic diabetes and distinction from the more prevalent type 2 diabetes are clinically significant; however, currently, there is no validated method to differentiate these diabetes subtypes. We describe a study, "Evaluation of a Mixed Meal Test for Diagnosis and Characterization of PancrEaTogEniC DiabeTes Secondary to Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis: The DETECT study," that seeks to address this knowledge gap. The DETECT study is a multicenter study that will examine differences in hormone and glucose excursions after a mixed meal test. The study will also create a biorepository that will be used to evaluate novel diagnostic biomarkers for differentiating these diabetes subtypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1239-1243
Number of pages5
JournalPancreas
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD; and †††Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. Received for publication July 14, 2018; accepted August 24, 2018. Address correspondence to: Phil A. Hart, MD, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 410 West Tenth Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (e‐mail: philip.hart@osumc.edu). Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases under award numbers U01DK108327 (P.A.H., M.D.B., D.B.), U01DK108288 (Y.K.), U01DK108323 (K.J.M., M.K.), U01DK108326 (M.B.), U01DK108328 (A.C.C., N.C., Y.Y.), U01DK108300 (A.H.), U01DK108314 (M.S.P., M.O.G.), and U01DK108306 (D.C.W., D.Y.). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors declare no conflict of interest. Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1097/MPA.0000000000001168

Keywords

  • glucagon
  • incretin hormone
  • insulin
  • pancreatic polypeptide
  • type 3c diabetes mellitus

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