Evaluating School Obesity-Related Policies Using Surveillance Tools: Lessons From The ScOPE Study

Marilyn S. Nanney, Toben F. Nelson, Martha Y. Kubik, Sara Coulter, Cynthia S. Davey, Richard MacLehose, Peter A. Rode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The evidence evaluating the association between school obestiy prevention policies and student weight is mixed. The lack of consistent findings may result, in part, from limited evaluation approaches. The goal of this article is to demonstrate the use of surveillance data to address methodological gaps and opportunities in the school policy evaluation literature using lessons from the School Obesity-Related Policy Evaluation (ScOPE) study. The ScOPE study uses a repeated, cross-sectional study design to evaluate the association between school food and activity policies in Minnesota and behavioral and weight status of youth attending those schools. Three surveillance tools are used to accomplish study goals: Minnesota School Health Profiles (2002-2012), Minnesota Student Survey (2001-2013), and National Center for Educational Statistics. The ScOPE study takes two broad steps. First, we assemble policy data across multiple years and monitor changes over time in school characteristics and the survey instrument(s), establish external validity, and describe trends and patterns in the distribution of policies. Second, we link policy data to student data on health behaviors and weight status, assess nonresponse bias, and identify cohorts of schools. To illustrate the potential for program evaluators, the process, challenges encountered, and solutions used in the ScOPE study are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Obesity
Students
Weights and Measures
Nutrition Policy
School Health Services
Health Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • obesity prevention
  • policy evaluation
  • population surveillance
  • school policy

Cite this

Evaluating School Obesity-Related Policies Using Surveillance Tools : Lessons From The ScOPE Study. / Nanney, Marilyn S.; Nelson, Toben F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Coulter, Sara; Davey, Cynthia S.; MacLehose, Richard; Rode, Peter A.

In: Health Promotion Practice, Vol. 15, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 622-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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