Ethical dilemma: offering short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for terminally ill children who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation.

Venkat Shankar, John P Costello, Syed M Peer, Darren Klugman, Dilip S Nath

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in terminally ill pediatric patients who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation requires careful deliberation. We present the case of a 16-year-old female with a relapse of acute lymphoid leukemia and acute-on-chronic cardiomyopathy who received short-term ECMO therapy. In addition, we highlight several ethical considerations that were crucial to this patient's family-centered care and demonstrate that this therapy can be accomplished in a manner that respects patient autonomy and family wishes.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorld journal for pediatric & congenital heart surgery
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherShankar,Venkat. Department of Critical Care Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
Pages311-314
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)2150-136X (Electronic)\r2150-1351 (Linking)
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Publication series

NameWorld journal for pediatric & congenital heart surgery
Volume5

Keywords

  • *Cardiomyopathies/th [Therapy]
  • *Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/es [Ethics]
  • *Heart Failure/th [Therapy]
  • *Medical Futility/es [Ethics]
  • *Terminal Care/es [Ethics]
  • Adolescent
  • Anthracyclines/ae [Adverse Effects]
  • Assisted Circulation
  • Cardiomyopathies/ci [Chemically Induced]
  • Disease Progression
  • Female
  • Heart Transplantation
  • Humans
  • Patient Transfer
  • Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/dt
  • Recurrence

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