Ethical and professional challenges posed by patients with genetic concerns: A report of focus group discussions with genetic counselors, physicians, and nurses

Patricia Mc Carthy Veach, Dianne M. Bartels, Bonnie S. LeRoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ninety-seven physicians, nurses, and genetic counselors from four regions within the United States participated in focus groups to identify the types of ethical and professional challenges that arise when their patients have genetic concerns. Responses were taped and transcribed and then analyzed using the Hill et al. (1997, Counsel Psychol 25:517-522) Consensual Qualitative Research method of analysis. Sixteen major ethical and professional domains and 63 subcategories were identified. Major domains are informed consent; withholding information; facing uncertainty; resource allocation; value conflicts; directiveness/nondirectiveness; determining the primary patient; professional identity issues; emotional responses; diversity issues; confidentiality; attaining/maintaining proficiency; professional misconduct; discrimination; colleague error; and documentation. Implications for practitioners who deal with genetic issues and recommendations for additional research are given.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-119
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

Keywords

  • Ethical and professional issues
  • Genetics patients

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