Establishment of Epstein-Barr virus growth-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

Joyce Hui-Yuen, Shane McAllister, Siva Koganti, Erik Hill, Sumita Bhaduri-Mcintosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Infection of B cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) leads to proliferation and subsequent immortalization, resulting in establishment of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) in vitro. Since LCL are latently infected with EBV, they provide a model system to investigate EBV latency and virus-driven B cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. LCL have been used to present antigens in a variety of immunologic assays. In addition, LCL can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies and provide a potentially unlimited source when access to primary biologic materials is limited. A variety of methods have been described to generate LCL. Earlier methods have included the use of mitogens such as phytohemagglutinin, lipopolysaccharide, and pokeweed mitogen to increase the efficiency of EBV-mediated immortalization. More recently, others have used immunosuppressive agents such as cyclosporin A to inhibit T cell-mediated killing of infected B cells. The considerable length of time from EBV infection to establishment of cell lines drives the requirement for quicker and more reliable methods for EBV-driven B cell growth transformation. Using a combination of high titer EBV and an immunosuppressive agent, we are able to consistently infect, transform, and generate LCL from B cells in peripheral blood. This method uses a small amount of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that are infected in vitroclusters of cells can be demonstrated. The presence of CD23 with EBV in the presence of FK506, a T cell immunosuppressant. Traditionally, outgrowth of proliferating B cells is monitored by visualization of microscopic clusters of cells about a week after infection with EBV. Clumps of LCL can be seen by the naked eye after several weeks. We describe an assay to determine early if EBV-mediated growth transformation is successful even before microscopic clusters of cells can be demonstrated. The presence of CD23hiCD58+ cells observed as early as three days post-infection indicates a successful outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere3321
JournalJournal of visualized experiments : JoVE
Issue number57
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Transformed Cell Line
Human Herpesvirus 4
Viruses
Cells
Cell Line
B-Lymphocytes
Growth
Immunosuppressive Agents
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
T-cells
Virus Latency
T-Lymphocytes
Pokeweed Mitogens
Assays
Blood
Tacrolimus
Phytohemagglutinins
Infection
Mitogens
Cyclosporine

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Establishment of Epstein-Barr virus growth-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. / Hui-Yuen, Joyce; McAllister, Shane; Koganti, Siva; Hill, Erik; Bhaduri-Mcintosh, Sumita.

In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, No. 57, e3321, 11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hui-Yuen, Joyce ; McAllister, Shane ; Koganti, Siva ; Hill, Erik ; Bhaduri-Mcintosh, Sumita. / Establishment of Epstein-Barr virus growth-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE. 2011 ; No. 57.
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