Entrepreneurship, secrecy, and productivity: A comparison of clinical and non-clinical life sciences faculty

Karen Seashore Louis, Lisa M. Jones, Melissa S. Anderson, David Blumenthal, Eric G. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

105 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper addresses research in the life sciences, responsible for significant national expenditures for scientific investigations funded by both the federal government and industry. Our investigation examines faculty members' involvement with industry in "entrepreneurial" ways that is, involved in translating their research into potentially marketable knowledge or products. First, this study examines whether there are differences in entrepreneurial behaviour between clinical and non-clinical faculty in the life sciences with industry relationships, and, second, to discover any linkage between entrepreneurship and secrecy or productivity in different ways for clinical and non-clinical faculty. The study is based on survey responses of a national sample of 4,000 clinical and non-clinical life sciences faculty in 49 U.S. research universities. The results show non-clinical faculty as more involved at the back end. The more entrepreneurial end of commercialization while clinical faculty are involved at the back end. The more entrepreneurial faculty (non-clinical) are more likely to be secretive about their research. Clinical faculty are less likely to have been denied access to research results or products. Entrepreneurial faculty are not less productive in their faculty roles. This investigation is preliminary in that it addresses one large area of academic research but excludes fields with longer historical relationships with industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-245
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Technology Transfer
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
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