Engraftment and survival following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for osteopetrosis using a reduced intensity conditioning regimen

J. Tolar, C. Bonfim, S. Grewal, P. Orchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (OP) is a disease characterized by osteoclast dysfunction, leading to multisystem morbidity and death of most affected children. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the treatment of choice for OP, but this patient population is particularly prone to post-transplant complications and death after myeloablative conditioning. To determine the potential of achieving improved overall outcomes in these patients by decreasing pre-transplant mortality, we investigated engraftment and survival following a reduced intensity regimen including busulfan, fludarabine and total lymphoid irradiation. We report outcomes in 11 patients. All six patients who received a bone marrow or peripheral stem cell graft engrafted with >75% donor chimerism. In contrast, all five recipients of unrelated cord blood as a stem cell source for a first graft failed to demonstrate donor hematopoietic chimerism. The day 100 and 6-month mortality was low at 9%. One year after HSCT, six of 11 patients (55%) were surviving. Our data suggest that this regimen results in low peri-transplant mortality without compromising engraftment when a marrow or peripheral stem cell graft is used. An umbilical cord blood graft, however, should be used with caution for patients with OP when this or a similar reduced intensity regimen is used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)783-787
Number of pages5
JournalBone marrow transplantation
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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