Engineering grain for better dietary health

R. R Ruan, Len Marquart, Keith Petrofsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The US Food and Drug Administration has allowed number of labels for whole-grain foods and grains containing fiber that reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers. Researchers have achieved functional improvements in agricultural fiber through process engineering. Also University of Minnesota researchers' patented process for making HRC results in a functional fiber with very high water hydration that increases moistness and acts as a fat replacer in foods. High-viscosity fiber can prevent re-absorption of bile acids that contain cholesterol during the digestion process, as an indicator of the cholesterol-lowering potential of fiber. The project has also received a grant through the Bioactive Food Components for Optimal Health program that will provide needed funding for research and graduate student support over the three-year life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-18
Number of pages3
JournalResource: Engineering and Technology for Sustainable World
Volume16
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

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engineering
dietary fiber
Health
Food
Fibers
Cholesterol
Research Personnel
Organized Financing
United States Food and Drug Administration
Bile Acids and Salts
Viscosity
researchers
Coronary Disease
cholesterol
Digestion
Fats
research support
Students
whole grain foods
Process engineering

Cite this

Engineering grain for better dietary health. / Ruan, R. R; Marquart, Len; Petrofsky, Keith.

In: Resource: Engineering and Technology for Sustainable World, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.09.2009, p. 16-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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