Enamel loss associated with orthodontic adhesive removal on teeth with white spot lesions: An in vitro study

Eser Tüfekçi, Thomas E. Merrill, Maria R. Pintado, John P. Beyer, William A. Brantley, Phillip M. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teeth with white spot lesions (WSL) might be more prone to enamel loss during bracket debonding. This in vitro study compared enamel loss from teeth with (n = 14) and without (n = 14) WSL after polishing with low-speed finishing burs or disks (Sof-Lex, 3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn). Debonded surfaces were analyzed with a contact stylus profilometer, and digitized data were compared with baseline readings by using AnSur NT software (Regents, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn). Specimen surfaces were also examined with a scanning electron microscope. Two-way analysis of variance was performed to analyze the data. In teeth without WSL, the volume losses were 0.16 mm3 for the bur group and 0.10 mm3 for the disk group; the mean maximum depths were 47.7 μm for the bur group and 54.3 μm for the disk group. In teeth with WSL, the volume losses were 0.06 and 0.17 mm3, and the mean maximum depths were 35.1 and 48.7 μm for the bur and disk groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in enamel loss between the 2 groups of teeth without WSL (P = .12). However, in teeth with WSL, the burs removed less enamel than the disks (P = 0.006). Scanning electron microscope examination showed that any damage on the enamel surface was usually located in the cervical third of the teeth. On most specimens, even though tooth surfaces appeared resin-free to the naked eye, there were remnants of it. The differences between groups were so small that they might be clinically insignificant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-739
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume125
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

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