Empirical study of sensing and defaulting in planning

Kurt Krebsbach, Duane Olawsky, Maria Gini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traditional approaches to task planning assume that the planner has access to all of the world information needed to develop a complete, correct plan which can then be executed in its entirety by an agent. Since this assumption does not typically hold in realistic domains, we have implemented a planner which can plan to perform sensor operations to allow an agent to gather the information necessary to complete planning and achieve its goals in the face of missing or uncertain environmental information. Naturally this approach requires some execution to be interleaved with the planning process. In this paper we present the results of a systematic experimental study of this planner's performance under various conditions. The chief difficulty arises when the agent performs actions which interfere with or, in the worst case, preclude the possibility of the achievement of its later goals. We have found that by making intelligent decisions about goal ordering, what to sense, and when to sense it, the planner can significantly reduce the risk of committing to premature action. We have studied the problem both from the perspective of reversible and irreversible actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProc 1 Int Conf Artif Intell Plann Syst
PublisherPubl by Morgan Kaufmann Publ Inc
Pages136-144
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)155860250X, 9781558602502
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
EventProceedings of the 1st International Conference on Artificial Intelligence Planning Systems - College Park, MD, USA
Duration: Jun 15 1992Jun 17 1992

Publication series

NameProc 1 Int Conf Artif Intell Plann Syst

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1st International Conference on Artificial Intelligence Planning Systems
CityCollege Park, MD, USA
Period6/15/926/17/92

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