Egyptian men working abroad

Labour supply responses by the women left behind

Christine Binzel, Ragui Assaad

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    33 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Female labour force participation has remained low in Egypt. This paper examines whether male international migration provides a leeway for women to enter the labour market and/or to increase their labour supply. In line with previous studies, we find a decrease in wage work particularly in urban areas. However, women living in rural areas and affected by migration are much more likely to be employed in non-wage activities (i.e. unpaid family work) and subsistence work compared to women in non-migrant households. Furthermore, we find evidence that this labour supply response is driven by the household's need to replace the migrant's labour rather than by a loosening of a financing constraint on family enterprises made possible by the flow of remittances.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalLabour Economics
    Volume18
    Issue numberSUPPL. 1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    Labor supply
    Supply response
    Household
    Female labor force participation
    Urban areas
    Subsistence
    Financing constraints
    Egypt
    Wages
    Remittances
    Migrant labor
    Labour market
    Work and family
    Family enterprise
    Rural areas
    International migration

    Keywords

    • Gender
    • Labour supply
    • Migration
    • Remittances

    Cite this

    Egyptian men working abroad : Labour supply responses by the women left behind. / Binzel, Christine; Assaad, Ragui.

    In: Labour Economics, Vol. 18, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.12.2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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