Efficacy of the Residential Care Transition Module: A Telehealth Intervention for Dementia Family Caregivers of Relatives Living in Residential Long-Term Care Settings

Joseph E. Gaugler, Robyn W. Birkeland, Elizabeth A. Albers, Colleen M Peterson, Katie W Louwagie, Zachary Baker, Mary S. Mittelman, Kenneth Hepburn, David L. Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Residential Care Transition Module, a six-session, psychosocial, and psychoeducational telehealth intervention for family caregivers of cognitively impaired relatives living in a residential long-term care setting. Eligible participants (including care recipients, regardless of time since admission) were randomized to treatment or usual care control conditions. Survey data were collected at baseline, 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months (N = 240). Primary analytic outcomes included caregiver subjective stress (a stress process mechanism) and depressive symptoms (a measure of global well-being). Secondary analytic outcomes included secondary role strains, residential care stress, caregiver sense of competence, and self-efficacy (additional mechanisms of action). General linear models tested for the main effects of the intervention at 4 months, and longitudinal mixed models examined the 12-month effects of the intervention. Post hoc analyses also examined the influence of moderators. No significant differences between the treatment and control groups for any primary analytic outcome were apparent. Caregivers in the treatment group whose relatives were admitted to residential long-term care in the prior 3 months were more likely to indicate reductions in depressive symptoms over the first 4 months of participation. Over the 12-month study period, caregivers in the treatment group who were employed reported increased self-efficacy over time. The heterogeneity of dementia care requires a broader consideration of key contextual factors that may influence the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions. Aligning measures with the preferences, goals, and values of dementia caregivers may further demonstrate the direct benefits of interventions such as the Residential Care Transition Module.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology and aging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© (2024) American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • assisted living
  • informal caregiving
  • intervention
  • nursing homes

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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