Effects of time limitation and egg limitation on lifetime reproductive success of a parasitoid in the field

George E. Heimpel, Marc Mangel, Jay A. Rosenheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used field observations of freely foraging Aphytis aonidiae parasitoids in conjunction with results of laboratory studies of A. aonidiae and other Aphytis species to simulate lifetime patterns of behavior and reproduction. Field observations provided estimates of encounter rates with three classes of hosts, the mortality rate from predation on adult parasitoids, and host-handling times for oviposition and host feeding by adult wasps. A series of physiological parameters, including the egg maturation rate and the value of host-feeding meals, were estimated from previously published studies. Plasticity in parasitoid behavior was incorporated in two ways. For one set of simulations we used a behavioral rule derived empirically from observations of parasitoids made in the field, and for another we used a dynamic state-variable model to generate a set of behavioral rules that maximize lifetime reproductive success. As was expected, the empirically derived rule led to better matches with field observations than did simulations using the output of the dynamic model. Projections of lifetime reproductive success in the field ranged between three and 37 eggs within the 95% confidence intervals of the mortality rate and host encounter rate and depending on which behavioral rule was used. Lifetime reproductive success from the simulation with central estimates of the mortality and host encounter rates that incorporated the empirical rule was 6.25 eggs. Using the empirical versus the theoretical rule in the simulations led to a 10%-30% decline in projections of lifetime reproductive success, depending on mortality and host encounter rates. Regardless of the behavioral rule, the simulations underscored the observation that the host encounter rate was greater than the egg maturation rate. The overall oviposition rate was sufficiently high to lead to daily episodes of temporary egg limitation during which parasitoids must mature an egg before being able to oviposit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-289
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Naturalist
Volume152
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

parasitoid
reproductive success
encounter rate
egg
parasitoids
Aphytis
mortality
simulation
oviposition
maturation
handling time
effect
wasp
dynamic models
confidence interval
plasticity
predation
foraging
rate

Keywords

  • Aphytis
  • Dynamic modeling
  • Egg limitation
  • Fecundity
  • Parasitoids
  • Reproductive success

Cite this

Effects of time limitation and egg limitation on lifetime reproductive success of a parasitoid in the field. / Heimpel, George E.; Mangel, Marc; Rosenheim, Jay A.

In: American Naturalist, Vol. 152, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 273-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{973883a1f1fb4b2183a663c1be0eb31d,
title = "Effects of time limitation and egg limitation on lifetime reproductive success of a parasitoid in the field",
abstract = "We used field observations of freely foraging Aphytis aonidiae parasitoids in conjunction with results of laboratory studies of A. aonidiae and other Aphytis species to simulate lifetime patterns of behavior and reproduction. Field observations provided estimates of encounter rates with three classes of hosts, the mortality rate from predation on adult parasitoids, and host-handling times for oviposition and host feeding by adult wasps. A series of physiological parameters, including the egg maturation rate and the value of host-feeding meals, were estimated from previously published studies. Plasticity in parasitoid behavior was incorporated in two ways. For one set of simulations we used a behavioral rule derived empirically from observations of parasitoids made in the field, and for another we used a dynamic state-variable model to generate a set of behavioral rules that maximize lifetime reproductive success. As was expected, the empirically derived rule led to better matches with field observations than did simulations using the output of the dynamic model. Projections of lifetime reproductive success in the field ranged between three and 37 eggs within the 95{\%} confidence intervals of the mortality rate and host encounter rate and depending on which behavioral rule was used. Lifetime reproductive success from the simulation with central estimates of the mortality and host encounter rates that incorporated the empirical rule was 6.25 eggs. Using the empirical versus the theoretical rule in the simulations led to a 10{\%}-30{\%} decline in projections of lifetime reproductive success, depending on mortality and host encounter rates. Regardless of the behavioral rule, the simulations underscored the observation that the host encounter rate was greater than the egg maturation rate. The overall oviposition rate was sufficiently high to lead to daily episodes of temporary egg limitation during which parasitoids must mature an egg before being able to oviposit.",
keywords = "Aphytis, Dynamic modeling, Egg limitation, Fecundity, Parasitoids, Reproductive success",
author = "Heimpel, {George E.} and Marc Mangel and Rosenheim, {Jay A.}",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/286167",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "152",
pages = "273--289",
journal = "American Naturalist",
issn = "0003-0147",
publisher = "University of Chicago",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of time limitation and egg limitation on lifetime reproductive success of a parasitoid in the field

AU - Heimpel, George E.

AU - Mangel, Marc

AU - Rosenheim, Jay A.

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - We used field observations of freely foraging Aphytis aonidiae parasitoids in conjunction with results of laboratory studies of A. aonidiae and other Aphytis species to simulate lifetime patterns of behavior and reproduction. Field observations provided estimates of encounter rates with three classes of hosts, the mortality rate from predation on adult parasitoids, and host-handling times for oviposition and host feeding by adult wasps. A series of physiological parameters, including the egg maturation rate and the value of host-feeding meals, were estimated from previously published studies. Plasticity in parasitoid behavior was incorporated in two ways. For one set of simulations we used a behavioral rule derived empirically from observations of parasitoids made in the field, and for another we used a dynamic state-variable model to generate a set of behavioral rules that maximize lifetime reproductive success. As was expected, the empirically derived rule led to better matches with field observations than did simulations using the output of the dynamic model. Projections of lifetime reproductive success in the field ranged between three and 37 eggs within the 95% confidence intervals of the mortality rate and host encounter rate and depending on which behavioral rule was used. Lifetime reproductive success from the simulation with central estimates of the mortality and host encounter rates that incorporated the empirical rule was 6.25 eggs. Using the empirical versus the theoretical rule in the simulations led to a 10%-30% decline in projections of lifetime reproductive success, depending on mortality and host encounter rates. Regardless of the behavioral rule, the simulations underscored the observation that the host encounter rate was greater than the egg maturation rate. The overall oviposition rate was sufficiently high to lead to daily episodes of temporary egg limitation during which parasitoids must mature an egg before being able to oviposit.

AB - We used field observations of freely foraging Aphytis aonidiae parasitoids in conjunction with results of laboratory studies of A. aonidiae and other Aphytis species to simulate lifetime patterns of behavior and reproduction. Field observations provided estimates of encounter rates with three classes of hosts, the mortality rate from predation on adult parasitoids, and host-handling times for oviposition and host feeding by adult wasps. A series of physiological parameters, including the egg maturation rate and the value of host-feeding meals, were estimated from previously published studies. Plasticity in parasitoid behavior was incorporated in two ways. For one set of simulations we used a behavioral rule derived empirically from observations of parasitoids made in the field, and for another we used a dynamic state-variable model to generate a set of behavioral rules that maximize lifetime reproductive success. As was expected, the empirically derived rule led to better matches with field observations than did simulations using the output of the dynamic model. Projections of lifetime reproductive success in the field ranged between three and 37 eggs within the 95% confidence intervals of the mortality rate and host encounter rate and depending on which behavioral rule was used. Lifetime reproductive success from the simulation with central estimates of the mortality and host encounter rates that incorporated the empirical rule was 6.25 eggs. Using the empirical versus the theoretical rule in the simulations led to a 10%-30% decline in projections of lifetime reproductive success, depending on mortality and host encounter rates. Regardless of the behavioral rule, the simulations underscored the observation that the host encounter rate was greater than the egg maturation rate. The overall oviposition rate was sufficiently high to lead to daily episodes of temporary egg limitation during which parasitoids must mature an egg before being able to oviposit.

KW - Aphytis

KW - Dynamic modeling

KW - Egg limitation

KW - Fecundity

KW - Parasitoids

KW - Reproductive success

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031823731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031823731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/286167

DO - 10.1086/286167

M3 - Article

C2 - 18811391

AN - SCOPUS:0031823731

VL - 152

SP - 273

EP - 289

JO - American Naturalist

JF - American Naturalist

SN - 0003-0147

IS - 2

ER -