Effects of shoe heel height on biologic rollover characteristics during walking

Andrew H. Hansen, Dudley S. Childress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

83 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of shoe heel height on the rollover characteristics of the biologic ankle-foot system. Ten nondisabled adult female volunteers walked using three pairs of shoes with varying heel heights and at three walking speeds with each pair of shoes. Kinematic and kinetic data needed to calculate the rollover shapes of the ankle-foot systems of the participants were collected. Rollover shapes are the effective rocker geometries that ankle-foot systems conform to between heel contact and opposite heel contact. Parameters of the best-fit circular arcs to the rollover shapes were used in an examination of the effects of shoe heel height on the ankle-foot system. The results support the notion that nondisabled humans automatically adapt their ankle-foot systems to accommodate a range of shoe heel heights, resulting in rollover shapes that do not change appreciably. Given physiologic constraints, this adaptation may not be possible for very high heels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-553
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2004

Keywords

  • Ankle
  • Foot
  • Gait
  • Human movement
  • Shoes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of shoe heel height on biologic rollover characteristics during walking'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this