Effects of relationship functioning on the biological experience of stress and physical health

Allison K. Farrell, Jeff Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we outline how relationship functioning affects the biological experience of stress and its consequences for physical health. Negative relationship perceptions and processes, such as attachment insecurity, hostility, and frequent conflict, tend to heighten stress responses and generate worse health over time, whereas positive relationship perceptions and processes, such as responsiveness, support, and intimacy, are generally associated with reduced or buffered stress responses and improved health (with some caveats). Future research should focus on the mechanisms behind these effects, the extent to which they can be changed or reversed, incorporating developmental perspectives, and effects of individual differences on these processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-53
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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