Effects of dietary supplementation with sodium chloride on urinary relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate in healthy dogs

Jody P Lulich, Carl A Osborne, Sherry L. Sanderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation with sodium chloride (NaCl) on urinary calcium excretion, urine calcium concentration, and urinary relative supersaturation (RSS) with calcium oxalate (CaOx). Animals - 6 adult female healthy Beagles. Procedure - By use of a crossover study design, a canned diet designed to decrease CaOx urolith recurrence with and without supplemental NaCl (ie, 1.2% and 0.24% sodium on a dry-matter basis, respectively) was fed to dogs for 6 weeks. Every 14 days, 24-hour urine samples were collected. Concentrations of lithogenic substances and urine pH were used to calculate values of urinary RSS with CaOx. Results - When dogs consumed a diet supplemented with NaCl, 24-hour urine volume and 24-hour urine calcium excretion increased. Dietary supplementation with NaCl was not associated with a change in urine calcium concentration. However, urine oxalate acid concentrations and values of urinary RSS with CaOx were significantly lower after feeding the NaCl-supplemented diet for 28 days. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Dietary supplementation with NaCl in a urolith-prevention diet decreased the propensity for CaOx crystallization in the urine of healthy adult Beagles. However, until long-term studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of dietary supplementation with NaCl in dogs with CaOx urolithiasis are preformed, we suggest that dietary supplementation with NaCl be used cautiously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-324
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

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Calcium Oxalate
calcium oxalate
Dietary Supplements
Sodium Chloride
sodium chloride
dietary supplements
Urine
Dogs
urine
dogs
Diet
Calcium
bladder calculi
calcium
Cross-Over Studies
Beagle
diet
excretion
Oxalates
Crystallization

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Effects of dietary supplementation with sodium chloride on urinary relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate in healthy dogs. / Lulich, Jody P; Osborne, Carl A; Sanderson, Sherry L.

In: American journal of veterinary research, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 319-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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