Effects of caffeine consumption in patients with chronic hepatitis C: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Veeravich Jaruvongvanich, Anawin Sanguankeo, Nattawat Klomjit, Sikarin Upala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Increased caffeine consumption has been associated with a decreased risk of liver enzyme elevation, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, few studies have assessed these effects in patients with chronic hepatitis C; therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the impact of caffeine consumption in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. Methods We performed a comprehensive search of the databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception through November 2015. The inclusion criterion was observational studies’ assessment of the impact of caffeine consumption in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C. Results Eleven studies were included for full article review, and data was extracted from five observational studies for meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio of advanced hepatic fibrosis in patients who had higher caffeine intake was 0.39 (95% confidence interval 0.21–0.72, P = 0.003) compared with lower caffeine intake group. The statistical between-study heterogeneity was moderate with an I2 of 70%. Conclusions Our meta-analysis demonstrated that caffeine intake is significantly associated with decreased odds of advanced hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Future prospective studies assessing the optimal dose and preparation of caffeinated beverages for prevention of hepatic fibrosis are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-55
Number of pages10
JournalClinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS

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