Effects of body position and ventilation/compression ratios during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cats.

R. A. Henik, W. E. Wingfield, G. M. Angleton, R. E. Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eighteen cats were anesthetized and were randomly assigned to 2 groups (9 cats/group). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed on each cat, with the cat in dorsal (group 1) or lateral (group 2) recumbency, by administering 5 external cardiac compressions/1 interposed (diastolic) ventilation (American Heart Association [AHA] technique; n = 3 cats/technique), simultaneous compression and ventilation (SCV; n = 3 cats/technique), or SCV with 1 interposed (diastolic) ventilation every tenth compression (SCV/DV; n = 3 cats/technique). Fourteen of the 18 cats were resuscitated. Central aortic and venous pressures were determined concurrently with lead II electrocardiography. Arterial blood samples were collected during the base-line period (after pressure fluctuations had stabilized, with the cats spontaneously breathing room air), 2.5 minutes after the onset of arrest (defined as the cessation of aortic pressure fluctuations), and after 10 minutes of CPR. Arterial blood gas values during the base-line period or during the period of arrest were not significantly different between group-1 and group-2 cats. After CPR, arterial pH and bicarbonate values were not significantly different between groups or between technique categories. The PaCO2 values were significantly lower in cats resuscitated by SCV or by SCV/DV than in cats resuscitated by AHA (P less than 0.05). The PaO2 values were significantly (P less than 0.001) higher in group-2 cats than in group-1 cats and were significantly (P less than 0.001) different between each technique category, with cats resuscitated by AHA having the lowest PaO2 and cats resuscitated by SCV/DV having the highest PaO2. Body position, CPR technique, sex, weight, or arterial blood gas values after CPR were not predictors of successful resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1603-1606
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume48
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1987

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