Effects of an extracurricular science intervention on science performance, self-worth, social skills, and sexist attitudes of Taiwanese adolescents from single-parent families

Zuway R. Hong, Huann Shyang Lin, Patricia McCarthy Veach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

A one group pretest-posttest design was used to investigate effects of an extracurricular science intervention on female and male junior high school students' science performance, self-worth, social skills, and sexist attitudes. Twenty-eight 8th grade Taiwanese students (16 boys, 12 girls) from single parent families participated in this study. Student responses to a questionnaire measuring their self-worth, social skills, and sexist attitudes, and interviews and classroom observations used for triangulation and consolidation of qualitative findings revealed that girls improved significantly on several indices of science performance, and that both boys and girls decreased their sexist attitudes. Girls had significantly less sexist attitudes than boys at both pretest and posttest. Implications for practice and research are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-567
Number of pages13
JournalSex Roles
Volume59
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

Keywords

  • Extracurricular science intervention
  • Science performance
  • Self-worth
  • Sexist attitudes
  • Single-parent family
  • Social skills

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