Effects of a high n-3 fatty acid diet on membrane lipid composition of heart and skeletal muscle in normal swine and in swine with the genetic mutation for malignant hyperthermia

W. Otten, P. A. Iaizzo, H. M. Eichinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Knowledge concerning the genetic defects underlying malignant hyperthermia (MH) has expanded rapidly in recent years. In contrast, our understanding of the accompanying physiological changes is less clear. In this regard, the aim of this study was to determine whether normal swine and swine susceptible to MH (both heterozygous and homozygous animals) differ in their abilities to incorporate n-3 (omega 3) fatty acids into their skeletal and heart muscles. Swine of each genotype were fed either a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) or an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All dietary supplementations were given over a 13-week period. Subsequently, for each muscle type the following was determined: 1) the relative fatty acid profiles of eight different phospholipid classes and of neutral lipids, and 2) the total phospholipid and the total lipid content. The incorporation of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) occurred within the various phospholipids and neutral lipids without influencing their total lipid content. The increased content of n-3 fatty acids in neutral lipids of skeletal muscle was related to a decreased content of medium-chain saturated fatty acids, whereas an increased incorporation of n-3 fatty acids into the membrane phospholipids was often related to a decreased content of linoleic acid and/or arachidonic acid. In general, the pattern of n-3 fatty acid incorporation was considerably different between the normal animals and the MH homozygous and heterozygous animals. The significant interaction between diet-induced n-3 fatty acid profiles and the stress-susceptible MH genotype may indicate an altered mechanism for fatty acid turnover and a repair mechanism to maintain cellular functions and structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2023-2034
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume38
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1997

Keywords

  • Diet supplementation
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Fish oil
  • Phospholipids

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