Effectiveness, Safety, and Sustainability of a Hand Water Pump Among Women Vegetable Farmers in the Gambia

Londa Vanderwa, Risto Rautiainen, Rex Kuye, Corinne Peek-Asa, Thomas Cook, Marizen Ramirez, Kennith Culp, Kelley Donham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women vegetable farmers (n = 48) in West Africa engaged in timed trials with a hand water pump and traditional water lifting methods. Use of the water pump increased the mean time required to lift water by 14% (p < 0.01), compared to traditional lifting. Average and maximum heart rates increased by 7% and 6%, respectively (each p < 0.01), compared to traditional water lifting. Discomfort and injury indicators were consistently better for the pump. Two months later, most subjects reported that the water pump was safer (65%), faster (77%), and was preferred (77%). Manual water pumps should be comprehensively evaluated for efficiency and long-term sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-407
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Sustainable Agriculture
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Hand water pump
  • Vegetable farming
  • Women
  • Worker health

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