Effectiveness of the gas turbine endwall fences in secondary flow control at elevated freestream turbulence levels

J. T. Chung, T. W. Simon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

A secondary flow management technique which employs a boundary layer fence on the endwall of a gas turbine passage is evaluated under freestream turbulence conditions that are representative of turbine conditions. A turbulence generator, which was able to reproduce the characteristics of the combustor exit flow, was used. The horseshoe and passage vortices observed in previous tests with low turbulence level remain coherent and strong within the cascade passage when the intensity is elevated to 10 percent. A boundary layer fence on the endwall remains effective in changing the path of the horseshoe vortex and reducing the influence of the vortex on the flow near the suction wall at the high freestream turbulence level. The fence is more effective in reducing the secondary flow for the high turbulence case than for a low 11 case, probably because the vortex which has been deflected into the core flow diffuses and dissipates faster in the more turbulent flow. The fence decreases aerodynamic losses for streamlines within the core of the channel flow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 1993 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition, GT 1993
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9780791878880
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
EventASME 1993 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition, GT 1993 - Cincinnati, United States
Duration: May 24 1993May 27 1993

Other

OtherASME 1993 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition, GT 1993
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati
Period5/24/935/27/93

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