Effectiveness of preoperative sedation with rectal midazolam, ketamine, or their combination in young children

D. S. Beebe, K. G. Belani, P. N. Chang, P. S. Hesse, J. S. Schuh, J. C. Liao, R. J. Palahniuk

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67 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine which of three types of rectal sedation was most effective preoperatively in facilitating parental separation and intravenous cannulation in young children, 100 children 3.0 ± 1.7 (mean ± SD) yr of age were randomly assigned to four equal groups. One group (M-K-A) received rectal midazolam (0.5 mg/kg), ketamine (3 mg/kg), and atropine (0.02 mg/kg). The other sedation groups received the same doses of midazolam and atropine (M-A) or ketamine and atropine (K-A) alone, and the control group (A) received only rectal atropine. Most children in either the M-K-A (100%) or M-A (92%) groups separated easily from their parents without struggling or crying, significantly more than in the K-A (60%) or A (64%) groups. However, more children in the M-K-A group (44%) were asleep during separation than in the M-A group (8%; P < 0.05). Only 20% of the children in the M-A or M-K-A groups cried during intravenous catheter placement, significantly less than in the K-A (56%) or A (92%) groups. Intravenous catheter placement was also successful significantly more often in the M-A (80%) and M-K-A (84%) groups than in the K-A (48%) or A (40%) groups. Complications were similar among the groups, but there was evidence that midazolam prolonged recovery time in some patients. Rectal midazolam with or without ketamine is a useful technique when intravenous catheter placement before induction of anesthesia is desired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-884
Number of pages5
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume75
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1992

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