Effect of sepsis syndrome on neonatal protein and energy metabolism

Jeanne D. Mrozek, Michael K Georgieff, Bruce R Blazar, Mark C Mammel, Sarah J Schwarzenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: It was our hypothesis that septic illness would alter both protein and energy metabolism in neonates, with elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) serving as markers for these effects. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 31 infants with suspected sepsis were enrolled into four groups: septic, sick-nonseptic, healthy-nonseptic, and recovered septic infants. Degree of illness, oxygen consumption, nitrogen balance, urine 3-methylhistidine/creatinine (MeH/Cr), and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. RESULTS: Oxygen consumption increased, while nitrogen balance decreased and MeH/Cr increased with increasing degree of illness. Nitrogen balance improved on recovery from sepsis. IL-6 and CRP levels were elevated in septic infants compared with sick-nonseptic and healthy infants. CONCLUSION: Neonates experience a hypermetabolic response with increased nitrogen loss during septic illness, proportional to the degree of illness. Increased delivery of protein substrate may be nutritionally advantageous to the septic neonate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-100
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
Energy Metabolism
Nitrogen
Interleukin-6
Newborn Infant
Interleukin-1
Oxygen Consumption
C-Reactive Protein
Creatinine
Sepsis
Proteins
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Urine
3-methylhistidine

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Effect of sepsis syndrome on neonatal protein and energy metabolism. / Mrozek, Jeanne D.; Georgieff, Michael K; Blazar, Bruce R; Mammel, Mark C; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 96-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Blazar, Bruce R

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AU - Schwarzenberg, Sarah J

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AB - OBJECTIVE: It was our hypothesis that septic illness would alter both protein and energy metabolism in neonates, with elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) serving as markers for these effects. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 31 infants with suspected sepsis were enrolled into four groups: septic, sick-nonseptic, healthy-nonseptic, and recovered septic infants. Degree of illness, oxygen consumption, nitrogen balance, urine 3-methylhistidine/creatinine (MeH/Cr), and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. RESULTS: Oxygen consumption increased, while nitrogen balance decreased and MeH/Cr increased with increasing degree of illness. Nitrogen balance improved on recovery from sepsis. IL-6 and CRP levels were elevated in septic infants compared with sick-nonseptic and healthy infants. CONCLUSION: Neonates experience a hypermetabolic response with increased nitrogen loss during septic illness, proportional to the degree of illness. Increased delivery of protein substrate may be nutritionally advantageous to the septic neonate.

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