Effect of processing conditions and excipients on dehydration kinetics of sodium naproxen hydrate in formulation

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The manufacture of oral dosage form may induce changes in the physical form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. One such example includes formation of hydrate during granulation followed by the reverse transition to the anhydrous form during drying. We used naproxen sodium dihydrate (DH) as the model compound and studied its dehydration at elevated temperature under different processing conditions, (i) in ambient air, (ii) in flow of inert gas (iii) under low pressure environment, and (iv) under ‘high’ pressure in closed environments. In situ variable temperature X-ray diffraction was used to monitor kinetics of phase transformation under these processing conditions. The DH dehydration was fastest under the flow of inert gas and slowest in closed environment. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), commonly used hygroscopic solids, were used as the model excipients to monitor influence of excipients in modulating DH dehydration behavior under different processing conditions. Both the excipients altered the kinetics as well as the extent of DH dehydration, with PVP delaying and MCC facilitating the transformation under all processing conditions studied. The results indicate that the physical form of API, such as hydrate or anhydrous in the present case, in the formulation may be modulated by rational excipient selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-228
Number of pages8
JournalInternational journal of pharmaceutics
Volume557
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 25 2019

Fingerprint

Naproxen
Excipients
Dehydration
Polyvinyls
Noble Gases
Pyrrolidinones
Pressure
Temperature
Dosage Forms
X-Ray Diffraction
Air
Pharmaceutical Preparations
microcrystalline cellulose

Keywords

  • Dehydration
  • Hygroscopic
  • Moisture sorption profile
  • Naproxen sodium
  • Wet granulation
  • X-ray diffraction

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Effect of processing conditions and excipients on dehydration kinetics of sodium naproxen hydrate in formulation",
abstract = "The manufacture of oral dosage form may induce changes in the physical form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. One such example includes formation of hydrate during granulation followed by the reverse transition to the anhydrous form during drying. We used naproxen sodium dihydrate (DH) as the model compound and studied its dehydration at elevated temperature under different processing conditions, (i) in ambient air, (ii) in flow of inert gas (iii) under low pressure environment, and (iv) under ‘high’ pressure in closed environments. In situ variable temperature X-ray diffraction was used to monitor kinetics of phase transformation under these processing conditions. The DH dehydration was fastest under the flow of inert gas and slowest in closed environment. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), commonly used hygroscopic solids, were used as the model excipients to monitor influence of excipients in modulating DH dehydration behavior under different processing conditions. Both the excipients altered the kinetics as well as the extent of DH dehydration, with PVP delaying and MCC facilitating the transformation under all processing conditions studied. The results indicate that the physical form of API, such as hydrate or anhydrous in the present case, in the formulation may be modulated by rational excipient selection.",
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T1 - Effect of processing conditions and excipients on dehydration kinetics of sodium naproxen hydrate in formulation

AU - Thakral, Seema

AU - Garcia Barriocanal, Javier

AU - Thakral, Naveen K.

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N2 - The manufacture of oral dosage form may induce changes in the physical form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. One such example includes formation of hydrate during granulation followed by the reverse transition to the anhydrous form during drying. We used naproxen sodium dihydrate (DH) as the model compound and studied its dehydration at elevated temperature under different processing conditions, (i) in ambient air, (ii) in flow of inert gas (iii) under low pressure environment, and (iv) under ‘high’ pressure in closed environments. In situ variable temperature X-ray diffraction was used to monitor kinetics of phase transformation under these processing conditions. The DH dehydration was fastest under the flow of inert gas and slowest in closed environment. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), commonly used hygroscopic solids, were used as the model excipients to monitor influence of excipients in modulating DH dehydration behavior under different processing conditions. Both the excipients altered the kinetics as well as the extent of DH dehydration, with PVP delaying and MCC facilitating the transformation under all processing conditions studied. The results indicate that the physical form of API, such as hydrate or anhydrous in the present case, in the formulation may be modulated by rational excipient selection.

AB - The manufacture of oral dosage form may induce changes in the physical form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. One such example includes formation of hydrate during granulation followed by the reverse transition to the anhydrous form during drying. We used naproxen sodium dihydrate (DH) as the model compound and studied its dehydration at elevated temperature under different processing conditions, (i) in ambient air, (ii) in flow of inert gas (iii) under low pressure environment, and (iv) under ‘high’ pressure in closed environments. In situ variable temperature X-ray diffraction was used to monitor kinetics of phase transformation under these processing conditions. The DH dehydration was fastest under the flow of inert gas and slowest in closed environment. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), commonly used hygroscopic solids, were used as the model excipients to monitor influence of excipients in modulating DH dehydration behavior under different processing conditions. Both the excipients altered the kinetics as well as the extent of DH dehydration, with PVP delaying and MCC facilitating the transformation under all processing conditions studied. The results indicate that the physical form of API, such as hydrate or anhydrous in the present case, in the formulation may be modulated by rational excipient selection.

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KW - Wet granulation

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