Effect of peripheral electrical stimulation on measures of tooth pain threshold and oral soft tissue comfort in children

Sami M. Abdulhameed, Robert J. Feigal, Joel D. Rudney, Keith C. Kajander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of peripheral electrical stimulation on tooth pain threshold and comfort of oral soft tissue was evaluated in 30 children, using a double-blind, crossover, study design. Tooth pain threshold was measured before and after 8 minutes of electrical or sham stimulation. Comfort of oral soft tissue during placement of a rubber dam clamp was evaluated 3 minutes after electrical or sham stimulation was begun. Comfort level was rated by each subject and by the investigator, using a visual analog scale (VAS). Heart rate was measured before and immediately following placement of the clamp. Electrical stimulation significantly increased tooth pain threshold and reduced the cardiovascular stress response without altering comfort levels during placement of the clamp. These findings suggest that peripheral electrical stimulation applied in a pediatric dental setting alters sensory aspects of pain but not affective aspects of comfort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-57
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesia progress
Volume36
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1989

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