Effect of obesity on outcomes after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma

Dan T. Vogl, Tao Wang, Waleska S. Pérez, Edward A. Stadtmauer, Daniel F. Heitjan, Hillard M. Lazarus, Robert A. Kyle, Ram Kamble, Daniel J Weisdorf, Vivek Roy, John Gibson, Karen Ballen, Leona Holmberg, Asad Bashey, Philip L. McCarthy, Cesar Freytes, Dipnarine Maharaj, Angelo Maiolino, David Vesole, Parameswaran Hari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Obesity has implications for chemotherapy dosing and selection of patients for therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AutoHCT) improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma, but optimal chemotherapy dosing for obese patients is poorly defined. We analyzed the outcomes of 1087 recipients of AutoHCT for myeloma reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2003 who received high-dose melphalan conditioning, with or without total body irradiation (TBI). We categorized patients by body mass index (BMI) as normal, overweight, obese, or severely obese. There was no overall effect of BMI on progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), progression, or nonrelapse mortality (NRM). In patients receiving melphalan and TBI conditioning, obese and severely obese patients had superior PFS and OS compared with normal and overweight patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is unclear. More obese patients were more likely to receive a reduced dose of melphalan, but there was no evidence that melphalan or TBI dosing variability affected PFS. Therefore, current common strategies of dosing melphalan do not impair outcomes for obese patients, and obesity should not exclude patients from consideration of autologous transplantation. Further research is necessary to optimize dosing of both chemotherapy and radiation in obese patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1765-1774
Number of pages10
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Vogl is supported by a Special Fellow in Clinical Research Award from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, a Scholar Award from the American Society of Hematology , and grant K23CA130074 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) .

Funding Information:
Financial disclosure: The CIBMTR is supported by Public Health Service Grant/Cooperative Agreement U24-CA76518 from the NCI, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) ; a Grant/Cooperative Agreement 5U01HL069294 from NHLBI and NCI ; a contract HHSH234200637015C with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA/DHHS); 2 Grants, N00014-06-1-0704 and N00014-08-1-0058, from the Office of Naval Research ; and grants from AABB; Aetna; American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation; Amgen, Inc. ; Anonymous donation to the Medical College of Wisconsin; Astellas Pharma US, Inc.; Baxter International, Inc.; Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals; Be the Match Foundation; Biogen IDEC; BioMarin Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Biovitrum AB; BloodCenter of Wisconsin; Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association; Bone Marrow Foundation; Buchanan Family Foundation; Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group; CaridianBCT; Celgene Corporation; CellGenix, GmbH; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Children’s Leukemia Research Association; ClinImmune Labs; CTI Clinical Trial and Consulting Services; Cubist Pharmaceuticals; Cylex Inc.; CytoTherm; DOR BioPharma, Inc.; Dynal Biotech, an Invitrogen Company; Eisai, Inc.; Enzon Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation; Gamida Cell, Ltd.; GE Healthcare; Genentech, Inc.; Genzyme Corporation; Histogenetics, Inc.; HKS Medical Information Systems; Hospira, Inc.; Infectious Diseases Society of America; Kiadis Pharma; Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd.; The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society; Merck & Company; The Medical College of Wisconsin; MGI Pharma, Inc.; Michigan Community Blood Centers; Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Miller Pharmacal Group; Milliman USA, Inc.; Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.; National Marrow Donor Program; Nature Publishing Group; New York Blood Center; Novartis Oncology; Oncology Nursing Society; Osiris Therapeutics, Inc.; Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Pall Life Sciences; Pfizer Inc.; Saladax Biomedical, Inc.; Schering Corporation; Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America; Soligenix, Inc.; StemCyte, Inc.; StemSoft Software, Inc.; Sysmex America, Inc.; THERAKOS, Inc.; Thermogenesis Corporation; Vidacare Corporation; Vion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; ViraCor Laboratories; ViroPharma, Inc.; and Wellpoint, Inc. The views expressed in this article do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, or any other agency of the U.S. Government.

Keywords

  • Autologous transplantation
  • Chemotherapy
  • Melphalan
  • Myeloma
  • Obesity
  • Radiation therapy

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