Effect of Estrogen Withdrawal on Energy-rich Phosphates and Prediction of Estrogen Dependence Monitored by in Vivo 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Four Human Breast Cancer Xenografts

Claus A. Kristensen, Paul E.G. Kristjansen, Nils Briinner, Robert Clarke, Mogens Spang-Thomsen

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75–1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet After Gompertzian growth was verified, the estrogen pellet was removed from half of the animals. In vivo 3,P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tumors was performed 1 day before and on days 2, 6, and 14 after estrogen removal. Estrogen withdrawal induced a significant increase in the nucleoside triphosphate:P1 ratio in the two estrogen-dependent xenografts, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the estrogen-independent tumors. In ZR75/LCC-3 tumors a slight decrease in nuceloside triphosphate:p1, was observed following onset of estrogen stimulation after initial growth without estrogen. Extracts of freeze-clamped tumors prepared 14 days after estrogen removal were analyzed for ATP and phosphocreatine content Our findings suggest a correlation between estrogen withdrawal and the steady-state concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and P, in human breast cancer xenografts. Discrimination analysis of the pretherapeutk spectra enabled us to identify the tumor line and the estrogen dependence of the tumors in 80–90% of all cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1664-1669
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume55
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 15 1995
Externally publishedYes

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