Effect of date of preplant tillage and planting on weed populations and mechanical weed control in soybean (Glycine max)

Douglas D. Buhler, Jeffery L. Gunsolus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Additional information on mechanical weed management systems is needed so producers can develop systems that meet their production and weed control goals without sacrificing profitability. Field research was conducted at Rosemount, MN, in 1989, 1990, and 1991 to determine the effect of preplant tillage and soybean planting date on weed populations and effectiveness of mechanical weed control operations. Delaying soybean planting from mid-May to early-June reduced weed densities and yield losses from weeds. Weed control with a herbicide treatment was not affected by planting date, but control with rotary hoeing and cultivation was often increased by delaying soybean planting. Early-planted soybean usually yielded better following herbicide treatment than mechanical weed control. However, when preplant tillage and planting were delayed, weed densities were reduced and mechanical weed control operations usually resulted in soybean yield similar to the herbicide treatment. While delaying soybean planting reduced weed densities and improved mechanical weed control, there is potential for reduced soybean yields with delayed planting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-379
Number of pages7
JournalWeed Science
Volume44
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 1996

Keywords

  • ABUTH
  • AMAPO
  • AMARE
  • CHEAL
  • Integrated weed management
  • SETFA
  • weed population dynamics

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