Effect of caprylic acid alone or in combination with peracetic acid against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg on chicken drumsticks in a soft scalding temperature-time setup

Shijinaraj Manjankattil, Divek V.T. Nair, Claire Peichel, Sally Noll, Tim Johnson, Ryan B Cox, Annie M. Donoghue, Anup Kollanoor Johny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The antimicrobial efficacy of caprylic acid (CA), a medium-chain fatty acid, against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg (MDR SH) on chicken drumsticks in a soft-scalding temperature-time setup was investigated. Based on the standardization experiments in nutrient media and on chicken breast fillet portions, intact chicken drumsticks were spot inoculated with MDR SH and immersed in water with or without antimicrobial treatments at 54°C for 2 min. The treatments included 0.5% CA, 1% CA, 0.05% peracetic acid (PAA), 0.5% CA + 0.05% PAA, and 1.0% CA + 0.05% PAA. Additionally, the efficacy of the potential scald treatments against MDR SH survival on drumsticks for a storage period of 48 h at 4°C was determined. Furthermore, the effect of these treatments on the surface color of the drumsticks was also evaluated. Appropriate controls were included for statistical comparisons. The antimicrobial treatments resulted in a significant reduction of MDR SH on drumsticks. For the lower inoculum (∼2.5 log 10 CFU/g) experiments, 0.5% CA, 1% CA, 0.05% PAA, 0.5% CA + 0.05% PAA, and 1.0% CA + 0.05% PAA resulted in 0.7-, 1.0-, 2.5-, 1.4-, and 1.5- log 10 CFU/g reduction of MDR SH on drumsticks, respectively (P < 0.05). The same treatments resulted in 0.9-, 1.3-, 2.5-, 2.2-, and 2.6- log 10 CFU/g reduction of MDR SH when the drumsticks were contaminated with a higher inoculum (∼4.5 log 10 CFU/g) level (P < 0.05). Moreover, the antimicrobial treatments inactivated MDR SH in the treatment water to undetectable levels, whereas 2.0- to 4.0- log 10 CFU/mL MDR SH survived in the positive controls (P < 0.05). Also, the treatments were effective in inhibiting MDR SH on the drumsticks compared to the respective controls during a storage period of 48 h at 4°C; however, the magnitude of reduction remained the same as observed during the treatment (P < 0.05). Additionally, none of the treatments affected the color of the drumsticks (P > 0.05). Results indicate that CA could be an effective natural processing aid against MDR SH on chicken products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101421
JournalPoultry science
Volume100
Issue number11
Early online dateAug 8 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the following funds: USDA NIFA Hatch project (Accession# 1016910), Minnesota Agricultural Experimentation Station Project# MIN-16-120, and USDA OREI Project 2017-51300-26815 subaward# 59-6022-7-002, awarded to Dr. Kollanoor Johny.

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge the Minnesota Discovery, Research and InnoVation Economy (MnDRIVE) Graduate Fellowship at the University of Minnesota awarded to Ms. Shijinaraj Manjankattil during the documentation and publication of this manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors

Keywords

  • caprylic acid
  • peracetic acid
  • Salmonella Heidelberg
  • scalding

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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